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Latest data from CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) showed that 977 people died after taking the COVID-19 vaccines | Tech News


The United States continues to make significant progress in the administration of coronavirus vaccines. Since December 2020, at least 20 million Americans have received the first dose of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. On Monday, we also reported how the Pfizer vaccine turns out to be the best COVID-19 vaccine available. The success of these vaccines can also be attributed to the decline in the number of coronavirus cases around the country.

However, with recent successes, there is a troubling report based on the data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about the number of people who died after taking the vaccines. Considering that both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines have undergone three phases of clinical trials and tested on about 70,000 people, it is shocking to find that over 900 people have died after taking coronavirus vaccines.

According to the latest data from CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a total of 977 have died after taking the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines. Between December 15, 2020, up to February 19, the CDC VAERS recorded a total of 977 deaths, accounting for 5.5% of 17,765 adverse events on the system’s report.

According to the information on CDC’s VAERS website, healthcare providers are required by law to report any advice effect from the vaccines to VAERS. The data are submitted by individuals and healthcare providers. However, the VAERS system also comes with the following disclaimer:

“VAERS accepts reports of adverse events and reactions that occur following vaccination. Healthcare providers, vaccine manufacturers, and the public can submit reports to the system. While very important in monitoring vaccine safety, VAERS reports alone cannot be used to determine if a vaccine caused or contributed to an adverse event or illness. The reports may contain information that is incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental, or unverifiable. In large part, reports to VAERS are voluntary, which means they are subject to biases. This creates specific limitations on how the data can be used scientifically. Data from VAERS reports should always be interpreted with these limitations in mind.”

Here is how VAERS describes the data, “VAERS is a passive reporting system, meaning it relies on individuals to send in reports of their experiences. Anyone can submit a report to VAERS, including parents and patients. Healthcare providers are required by law to report to VAERS: Any adverse event listed in the VAERS Table of Reportable Events Following Vaccination that occurs within the specified time period after vaccinations and An adverse event listed by the vaccine manufacturer as a contraindication to further doses of the vaccine.

Meanwhile, the AP Fact Check website said that online claims that show people who have died after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine using the CDC’s VAERS data, is a misrepresentation of the data and their reporting is missing the context. AP said that the “posts online are using [VAERS] data from an adverse event reporting system to cast doubt on the vaccine.

Below is how AP Fact Checker describes it:

“CLAIM: Screenshots of the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System show people who have died after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine.

AP’S ASSESSMENT: Missing context. The VAERS system is an unverified reporting system that does not determine if a vaccine caused the events that are reported.

THE FACTS: As more and more Americans receive the COVID-19 vaccine, posts online are using data from an adverse event reporting system to cast doubt on the vaccine.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which run the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, are quick to note the limitation of the data, which serve as an early signal to detect issues with any vaccines.”

 

Even if AP is right, the CDC bears some responsibility for the verification of the integrity and accuracy of the data posted on its website by healthcare providers. To quote former President Reagan, “trust, but verify.”




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